Thanks, Hutch

He never lost his touch when it came to putting physicality in the music,  and he demanded that the group interplay not only be sharp, but the blues be front and center. He always let you see him sweat, but elegance was always paramount.

Nate on Hutch

JoMo at The Stone This Week

 

The idiosyncratic guitarist is all about collaboration; he’s got several ways to nurture the action of his teammates.LET THE MUSIC TAKE YOU.

The Stone Residencies: Joe Morris
August 16-21

Tuesday, 8.16

8 PM
Eloping with the Sun
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjoule, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

10 PM
Altitude
Joe Morris / guitar
William Parker / bass, zintar
Gerald Cleaver / drums

Wednesday, 8.17

8 PM
Jason Hwang / violin
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice
Petr Cancura / tenor saxophone

10 PM
Gerald Cleaver / drums and percussion
Fay Victor / voice
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice
Petr Cancura / tenor saxophone

Thursday, 8.18

8 PM
Gerald Cleaver / drums and percussion
Joe McPhee, tenor saxophone, pocket trumpet
Joshua Abrams / bass, guimbre
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

10 PM
Gerald Cleaver / drums and percussion
Taylor Ho Bynum / cornet
Joshua Abrams / bass, guimbre
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

Friday, 8.19

8 PM
Ned Rothenberg / clarinet, bass clarinet, sax
Joshua Abrams (bass, guimbre
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

10 PM
Jim Hobbs / alto saxophone
Joshua Abrams / bass, guimbre
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

Saturday, 8.20

8 PM
Tony Malaby / tenor sax)
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Hamid Drake / drums, frame drum, percussion, voice

10 PM
Gerald Cleaver / drums and percussion
Joe Morris / guitar, bass, banjo, banjouke, fiddle, pocket trumpet
William Parker / bass, dos n’ngoni, zintar, flutes
Craig Taborn / piano

Sunday, 8.21

8 and 10 PM
Joe Morris Quartet
Joe Morris / guitar
Mat Maneri / viola
Chris Lightcap / bass
Gerald Cleaver / drums

 

The Stone 

Crate-Digging With Nels

Lovers (Blue Note) drops Friday. Here are some of its sources

Newport Jazz Fest Countdown: Kris Davis

I used to be fascinated with Anthony Davis’ solo work. Lady of the Mirrors and Past Lives made it seem that the pianist was letting you know exactly what was on his mind at every second during the performance. Kris Davis does something similar, perhaps why many jazz fans have been so smitten with her work for the last few years. Aeriol Piano and Massive Threads are records that capture the kind of focus improvisers need to have in order to compellingly ramble wherever their muse takes them. The Brooklyn-based pianist is one of those artists whose muse demands your full attention, and rewards that dedication with a version of beauty that you just might not have heard before. I’ve been smitten with “A Different Kind of Sleep” from Aeriol Piano (Clean Feed) for a year or so now. You can call it a ballad of sorts; it moves slowly and uses few notes, sketching a mood that sometimes seems both forlorn and fragile – there’s a dreaminess at play. She’s certainly attracted to animation, as well. The drummed clusters that are part of her improvisations arrive with an authoritative vigor. The secret weapon is touch. All the maneuvers are deeply fluid in Davis’ music. When you see her solo in the Storyville room at Fort Adams, sit close. It’s intriguing to watch her bring those inner thoughts to the keyboard.

Newport Jazz Fest

Newport Jazz Fest Countdown: Butler, Bernstein & the Hot 9

Remember how hip it sounded when Steven Bernstein gave Robert Altman’s vision a big dose of red blood on the Kansas City soundtrack? Everything about the film felt a bit more “real” because SB and the cats were in full rollick mode. Hearing modernists put their heart into Moten’s “Lafayette” and Henderson’s “Yeah Man” reminded us just how giddy and grand this music could be. Then came the Millennial Territory Orchestra – Bernstein unearthing forgotten jewels from the stompers that kept dancers in the Midwest and South jumping in the ‘30s and ‘40s. As the MTO’s swing boiled over, a kind of scholarship bubbles up, suggesting that repertory is a bit more pliable that some zealots believed. They gave everything a hot foot, which is also the game plan with Butler, Bernstein & the Hot 9. In January, at the Winter Jazz Festival in New York, they turned the place upside down with red-zone renditions of N’awlins nuggets. Pianist Henry Butler is a NOLA native, and his virtuosic punch matches Bernstein’s visionary verve. Pieces like “Gimme A Pigfoot,” Dixie Walker” and “Some Iko,” all part of their Viper’s Drag (Impulse!), catch fire quickly. These guys are expert at animating every nook and cranny of a tune.

Newport Jazz Fest 

Henry plays solo

Etienne Charles San Jose Suite (Culture Shock)

 

Seems like many cultural rainbows have roots in political tension, so perhaps it’s wise to hear Etienne Charles’ buoyant 10-song collage as a narrative arc highlighting the silver lining of invention that lies behind the passions of resistance. As the talented trumpeter essays a few historical turns in the San Jose locales of Costa Rica, California and his native Trinidad, he and his sextet concoct a variety of temperaments, and from celebration to defiance, each is as engaging as the next.

Although it has an amiable glide to it, “Baruca” is inspired by a festival that recalls battles between Costa Rica’s indigenous peoples and Spanish conquistadors. Esprit and sobriety share space in the band’s rendering, which illustrates a group trait sustained throughout the disc: the musicians are utterly casual, but radically tight. “Limon” is built on a steady rhythmic push, an homage to the work of community building. It’s balanced by the élan of “Cahuita,” which fairly prances in its calypso-slanted revelry.

The pliability of Miles Davis’ second classic quintet seems to provide Charleswith as much inspiration as the Caribbean history he essays. The leader’s horn and Brian Hogans’ alto are expert at maneuvering between the elastic designs of the rhythm section. “Hyarima” broods its way through an ominous vibe, and Hogans lays out a fervent solo with Arthur Blythe inflections on “Revolt,” a tense reimagining of a consequential Trinidad uprising that finds drummer John Davis bringing the ardor.

Charles’ inspirations aren’t entirely ancient. The ensemble’s glance at California’s San Jose has to do with the area’s wealth imbalance in a post-Silicon Valley era, and the roiling “Speed City,” a modern broadside that waxes funky while launching a spoken word blast, recounts the segregation woes that once marked the campus of San Jose State University. Here the folkloric lyricism that started the album morphs into modern turbulence. As the transition takes place, it’s pretty obvious that Charles has delivered a potent punch.

Etienne Charles plays the Newport Jazz Festival Friday, July 29 

Downbeat 

 

Newport Jazz Fest Countdown: Tyshawn Sorey

Almost every Tyshawn Sorey show I’ve seen is emblazoned in my mind. The old Roulette in SoHo where he elicited a series of gasps with the way he messed with negative space. An incredible evening of “anything-goes” in a duet with Ben Gerstein at iBeam in Brooklyn. One of the most engaging piano trio gigs I’ve ever seen at the Vanguard…the list goes on. As a bandleader, the drummer makes his mark by fully trusting his conceptual gambits. Operating “in the moment” is one of jazz’s bedrock cliches, but Sorey does it as a matter of course and with so much sensitivity that even the smallest of gestures carries a wallop (check the range of his playing with Fieldwork above). A progressive composer whose sound sculptures actively employ silence and forthrightly mess with expected dynamics, you can feel the determination guiding the action in his Alloy trio. Its pianist Corey Smythe boasts a temperament that always brings patience to the foreground. Playing Sorey’s pieces on Alloy (Pi Recordings), he revels in every aspect of a decaying note. “A Love Song” spends much of its 30 minutes ruminating on the pull of aura – modern classical as filtered through the prism of someone who appreciates the AACM’s spin on pure sound. It might be hard to absorb the group’s full impact from an outdoor stage – introspection seems to be its essence and festival shows usually rely on gregariousness. Sorey’s courageous gambits just might be the Newport concert that makes some listeners scratch their heads, but rest assured: the drama is substantial and the emotions are volatile.

Tyshawn

Newport Jazz Fest 2016