This Week’s Jazz Internet Wrap-Up

A Blog Supreme offers a bounty of show streams from Newport, generates a group chat about the weekend’s up and downs, and delivers a deconstructive history of WC Handy’s “St Louis Blues.”

Howard Mandel dodges the scalding sun and the torrential downpour and uses digi-tech to review the above-mentioned Newport shows from his BK home-office.

Peter Hum schleps the width of New York and New England to reach the City By the Sea and offers a three-part overview of his Newport findings, scrutinizing both improv and local taste treats.

Ben Ratliff ponders Newport’s present-tense effectiveness, as does Jon Garelick as does Ken Frankling, as does Steve Greenlee. Jazz Times’ Bill Milkowski heads to western Mass to assess the Litchfield Jazz Fest. Tammy La Gorce looks to the future for a glimpse behind the Montclair Jazz Fest.

The Jazz Session reaches it’s membership drive goals (Yay!) and interviews Tyshawn Sorey. Jason also heads off to Seussville with a Green Eggs and Monk track.

Nate Chinen reviews Rez Abazzi’s Iridium show, and provides another weekly wealth of jazz gig suggestions. I tout three in the Voice, Greg Osby, Jerry Gonzalez, and Liberty Ellman.

Destination Out burrows deeper into the Ra wormhole and comes up with some beauts – the site also raises a placard about Bill Dixon’s FMP title, too.

Kevin Whitehead looks into Gary Burton’s “tight-knit working band” on a new disc for Fresh Air. His recent Julius Hemphill overview for eMusic also gets tweeted a bit this week.

David Adler examines records by Eric Harland and Owen Howard. You know Harland was on Kind of Blue, right? Howard was previously celebrated by Whitehead as well. Harland gets more props here.

Ted Panken drops extraordinary talks with Pat Metheny, Dave Brubeck, Roscoe Mitchell and Abbey Lincoln.

Ken Frankling celebrates the new Miguel Zenon repertory album. Marsalis Music streams it here.

George Colligan roams around Kenny Barron’s enja titles and recalls their still-radiant glory.

Checkout Jazz returned from Rhode Island and brought the world live shows by Marcus Strickland and (who else?) Eric Harland. He also schooled his Twitter stream (@Checkoutjazz) about audience demographics and the value of listening Jenny Scheinman’s Mischief & Mayhem this upcoming Wednesday night.

Will Layman investigates James Farm’s debut.

Larry Appelbaum posts a chat with the one and only Uri Caine. First talking point: Hank Mobley.

Phil Freeman makes a Spotify list for Burning Ambulance, and reviews Sean Nowell’s Omni-Tone disc.

DownBeat reports on the Von Freeman salute.

Take the A Train lists the 25 Best Jazz Film Scores.

Bret Sjerven shines a light on Pheeroan’s ak Laff’s Passin’ Thru disc.

AccuJazz launches new radio channels featuring artists scheduled for the upcoming Chicago, Monterey, and Detroit Jazz Festivals.

Fred Kaplan explains how swell it is to hear Sonny Rollins’ Newk’s Time spin at 45 rpm. To paraphrase, let’s just say it’s “Wonderful, Wonderful.”

Peter Margasak waxes poetic on the glory of Amade Ardoin.

@VijayIyer let the Facebook troops know that his esteemed trio just ducked into the studio to fashion their third disc. Fingers crossed that it quakes and quivers with as much smarts as their last jewel. Fieldwork about to reunite on the 17 + 18 at the Stone.

JazzWax fills us in on Johnny Richards.

Jazz Times has Chris Wood choose some Mingus masterpieces. Yep, I agree with “Switch Blade,” too.

About.com reviews the New York Standard Quartet’s Unstandard.

Chris Barton catches up with the Klein & Goldberg Sunnyside date. Tom Hull mentions Bienestan while sorting through his sizable stacks as well.

Riffs on Jazz offers a historical glimpse at this week’s calendar.

One response to “This Week’s Jazz Internet Wrap-Up

  1. Pingback: Around The Jazz Internet: Aug. 19, 2011 – StereoStone USA Audio Shop

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