Tag Archives: dave douglas

Dave Douglas @ 92 St Y on Wednesday

The trumpeter/bandleader gets noticed with every move, but the fact that the new Be Still features Crooked Still’s Aoife O’Donovan upping the plaintive quotient with her vocals is especially buzzworthy. It almost makes an act of uniting tunes by Vaughan Williams and Ola Belle Reed seem like business as usual. Both are valuable gambits however: Team Douglas’s interplay has never had more heart. 

VOICE

can’t be there? hear it live anyway

10 Best Things About Day One of the Newport Jazz Festival

1. Dave Douglas’s soloing posture

2. Jason Moran’s left hand

3. Rudresh Mahanthappa’s frakking of selected notes during solo with Team DeJohnette

5. Joe Lovano’s arm gestures when explaining something to a pal

6. Dave King’s laff

7. Jack DeJohnette’s foot on the kick drum

8. Unison swoop of Dafnis Prieto’s front line

9. Paul Motian floating above the stage during TBP+BF’s “It Should’ve Happened A Long Time Ago”

10. The standing ovation that the above performance earned from its packed audience. 

+ 1 extra since it was such a swell day: 

11. James Carter’s outfit

SHOWS NOT TO MISS ON SUNDAY

Video

Lovano/Douglas 5tet in Action

Psyched for their Newport hit.

Gorgeous Steve Byram Cover To Dave Douglas’ New Disc

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Dave Douglas: Ecstasy In The West Village

Last night Dave Douglas celebrated his birthday at the Village Vanguard, which in a recent tweet the esteemed trumpeter correctly deemed “the Carnegie Hall of basements.” Douglas is in the West Village leading his Brass Ecstasy troupe. The gig is a celebration of sorts: United Front: Brass Ecstasy at Newport (Greenleaf) just dropped. It’s a nod to a few of the leader’s horn inspirations, including Navarro, Bowie and Rava. I watched ’em clock the performance last summer in Rhode Island, and it was sweet show, full of nuance and frolic. Dave’s added some new pieces to the book since then (one poster for the show mentioned a program of “Strayhorn, Tweedy, more”). He also recently tweeted about a tune called “My Old Sign,” about “changes to the zodiac and compatibility.” A pal texted me from the Wednesday night show and was throwing the exclamation points around. My recommendation for the Vanguard gig looks like this. You’ve still got three more nights to pack the place. The above clip finds the guys in action at chez Boilen.

Top Five Moments of the Newport Jazz Festival 2010

Fun weekend. Here are a few of the moments that refuse to leave my mind.

Matt Wilson’s Bubbles:

We all know he’s one of those “pure imagination” cats, but the drummer was truly on his game at a show that kicked-off Sunday morning’s action. He’s usually got a wild card up his sleeve, and in this case it was a kid’s bubble-making machine that was supposed to add some visual fun to his spin on a  Carl Sandburg poem.  It was too windy and the soapy spheres weren’t shooting out, and as his double quartet provided some truly luminous sounds, he rolled with the flow and silently mouthed a message to the audience: “Imagine bubbles.” It was a cinch to do so. Wilson always makes everything ultra vivid.

Brian Blade’s Drama:

I stood behind the drummer and looked into the crowd. One guy was biting his nails, another fidgeting in his seat. Powering David Binney’s Third Occasion ensemble, Blade turned a wealth of rhythmic subtleties into a surge of sound that was always in flux. When a cymbal crash finally punctuated a passage, it was borderline frightening.

Matt Shipp’s Focus:

The pianist is often locked into his keys when he’s on stage, and this was no different. But his slippery storm of notes, forever moving from register to register, was a study in daring, and his mates – bassist Joe Morris and saxophonist Marshall Allen – got all the inspiration they needed from his rumbling volcano approach.

George Wein Calls “The Mooche”:

“We’ve played it before, but we never rehearsed it,’ said the impressario/pianist during a gig with his Newport All Stars, and the somewhat informal romp through Ellington’s jewel took shape moment by moment, with a gaggle of horns – everyone from Harry Allen to Randy Sandke to Anat Cohen – finding a harmony to use on the head and some elbow room to stretch a bit.  Melodies like this generate goose bumps, and the group’s easy-going attitude was key to the vibe.

Dave Douglas Has A Hankering:

Nothing new about jazz bandleaders doing non-jazz tunes, but some covers fit better than others. The trumpeter’s Brass Ecstasy ensemble seemed wonderfully built for a saunter through Hank Williams‘ “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” and as the leader starting telling us about the moon going behind a cloud, I swear I heard Marcus Rojas‘s tuba making like a forlorn steel guitar.

Dave Douglas, Birthday Boy

DD‘s got plenty of swagger in this clip. And Nasheet sounds sweet rolling him all that propulsion (caught Waits last night at James Carney‘s Korzo series, and he was feeding Russ Lossing lotsa propulsion, too).

Happy Birthday to Nick Lowe, too.